Tag Archives: Love

Eight months of absolute bliss!!

I know this is the most cliche sentence I can say but still I’ll say it… It seems like yesterday that we got married… doesn’t feel like eight months by any stretch of imagination!!! And its so overwhelming to remember each of those special moments that we witnessed in this period… The SMS fight just before you reached the wedding venue, my first day at your place, the honeymoon and so many other trips, the fights, the disagreements and the warmth on solving those disagreements, understanding and knowing each other more and more everyday, the good, bad and ugly times…aah… i can go on and on and on…

Its unbelievable for me and for others who know me… to see that someone has tolerated me for so long… and that without many grins 🙂 I know how impossible I get at times… I also know how nasty I get at times but then again, I ove doing that also 😀

On a more serious note, I still believe that I couldn’t have been luckier… coz you are the best for me 🙂 I love you… 🙂 more than you will ever know… more than I can ever say… and though it seems like yesterday when we got married… I can’t imagine my life without you! You’re a sweetheart tuts! 🙂

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Funny Proposal – Attempt 1

On public demand, here I am posting the first attempt of Funny proposal made by Mr Ashiq (a.k.a. Karan), after visiting the Facebook profile of a friend..
Here it goes and hold your stomach.. lol

“Subject: SHAADI KAROGE..I M SERIOUS TRUST ME..
ohhh…my gawd…seriously yaar..i mean..u knw..kya yaar…U REALLY LUK….BINDAAZ….kash kash kash…tum meri GF hoti…anywaz jokes apart..u really luk cute…okay nw..tel m if a person luk cute/bindaaz/bla bla…wat is d procedure 2 knw tht person more..????????is there any FORMS…hmm..shaAdi karoge.???

AS A HUMAN PLZ REPLY BAK..$hhhhhh STRESS ON D WORD \”HUMAN\” SO PLZ REPLY…
regards
karan”

Wat a serious attempt.. hats off of Mr Karan J 😀 😀

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On the Track..

Got to read the following excerpt from one of my favorite books “The Zahir” by Paulo Cohelo… and thought of sharing it at my blog.. and, here it goes..

“I went to a train station today and learned that the distance between railway tracks is always 143.5 centimeters or 4 feet 8.1/2 inches. Why this absurd measurement? I asked my girlfriend to find out and this is what she discovered. When they built the first train carriages, they used the same tools as they had for building horse-drawn carriages. And why that distance between the wheels on carriages? Because that was the width of the old roads along which the carriages had to travel. And who decided that roads should be that width? Well, suddenly, we are plunged back into the distant past. It was the Romans, the first great road-builders, who decided to make their roads that width. And why? Because there chariots were pulled by two horses, and when placed side by side, the horses they used at the time took up 143.5 cm.

So the distance between the tracks I saw today used by our state-of- the- art high-speed (French) trains, was determined by the Romans. When people went to the United States and started building railways there, it didn’t occur to them to change the width and so it stayed as it was. This even affected the building of space shuttles. American engineers thought the fuel tanks should be wider, but the tanks were built in Utah and had to be transported by train to the Space Center in Florida, and the tunnels couldn’t take anything wider. And so they had to accept the measurement that the Romans had decided as the ideal. But what has all this to do with marriage?

I paused. It has everything to do with marriage… At some point in history, someone turned up and said: when two people get married, they must stay frozen like that for the rest of their lives. You will move along side by side like two tracks, keeping always that same distance apart. Even if sometimes one of you needs to be a little further away or a little closer, that is against the rules. The rules say: be sensible, think of the future, think of your children.

You cant change, you must be like two railway tracks that remain the same distance apart all the way from their point of departure to their destination. The rules don’t allow for love to change, or to grow at the start and diminish halfway through – it is too dangerous. And so, after the enthusiasm of the first few years, they maintain the same distance, the same solidity, the same functional nature. Your purpose is to allow the train bearing the survival of the species to head off into the future: your children will only be happy if you stay just as you were – 143.5 cm. apart!!

If you are not happy with something that never changes, think of them, think of the children you brought into the world. Think of your neighbours. Show them that you are happy, eat roast beef on Sundays, watch television, help the community. Think of society: dress in such a way that everyone knows you are in perfect harmony Never glance to the side, someone might be watching you, and that could bring temptation, it could mean divorce, crisis, depression. Smile in all the photos. Put the photos in the living room, so that everyone can see them. ….. but never forget, these rules were established long ago and must be respected. Who established these rules? That doesn’t matter. Don’t question them, because they will always apply, even if you don’t agree with them.”

Well…to be honest…I don’t really want to agree with the writer here. Yes, the rules used to be those… till sometime back. But not anymore. With changing times, people are becoming sensible enough to think of themselves and their happiness before thinking of the ‘society’. That doesn’t mean we ignore the society completely…not here in India for sure… but things are definitely changing. We are moving towards more of a WIN-WIN situation.. Aren’t we?

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I am married!!

I’ve written about a lot of things on my blog that I felt were important (and unimportant too) to me, so it’s something of an uncanny feeling to know that I’m writing about the one that’s the most important thing I’ve ever written. I got married, yeah I know I’m late in writing this… its been over a month that I got married. I so wanted to write this post but couldn’t do so earlier.. thinking that its always better late than never.. here it starts..

My hubby’s name (yeah hubby!) is Saurabh Tuteja (I call him Tutu as many of his friends) Many of you who know me in person have met him and know of him.

It’s hard to find words to describe something as amazing as what this past month and half was like for me. The funny thing about life is that the most profound things are often the most banal. Our story is unique and at the same time exactly the same as every love story that’s ever been. Though this was the most personal thing I’ve ever been through, it’s one of the few events so universal that almost everyone understands it. And I wish everyone could have the happiness we do, and could have as much fun as we’ve been having.

But there are the parts that are uniquely us, maybe even some ideas that might inspire other people who wrestle with the everyday details of relationships, commitment, family, friendship, and marriage. I don’t intend to write about what he means to me, because some things are just for us.

So how did I get to this point? Growing up, I didn’t understand marriage in the same way as my peers. My parents basically had an arranged marriage, which gave me a vastly different perspective on the path to commitment. (Arranged marriages aren’t quite as exotic as most people seem to think: Being set up with someone who shares your economic, cultural, religious, and social background is pretty much a universal tendency, whether the setup happens through one’s parents, a temple mixer, or on any shaadi.com.)

The defining trait of marriage in these contexts is that the commitment comes first. It doesn’t occur to most people to get upset that they don’t get to choose their siblings; You just love your brother or sister, or you try to, and you fight sometimes and you disagree, and then you get over it, and that’s what family is about. And in some ways, marriage can be like that, too. There’s a liberation in knowing you don’t have an easy out: You know you’re going to make it work, and you’re not going to give up.

So one of the great things about having had the perspective of another culture’s look at marriage was realizing that there’s a freedom in knowing you can always count on the commitment as a framework that you work within. The absence of that immutable commitment was the thing I most lamented and was dismayed by in so many of the marriages I saw growing up. And it made it easier to know when I was ready and that I’d found the right person who shared that desire, even in a thoroughly Indian context.

Once you get to the point where you know you’re ready to get married, though, there’s a lot of logistics. And I think it’s probably stressful for most people. Everything I’d seen on television or movies or magazines seemed so much more focused on people getting “weddinged” than on getting married. If you tell people you’re engaged, they start talking to you about that one day, and almost never about the other half century you’re signing up for.

The sad truth is, when it comes time to get married, people talk about arbitrary (or tacky!) traditions and what kind of dessert you’re going to have and who’s sitting at what table. But they don’t talk about whether the couple really tells each other the truth, whether they share the same opinion about family and things. If those things don’t sound romantic to you, then maybe you’re not doing it right.

I’ve been married of just one and a half month; I won’t pretend that I can give anybody advice on married life. But I’ve already seen what’s worked to get me to a commitment and a love I never thought I’d find. I’ve learned that, when you’re doing things right, starting a life together as a couple can be fun and enjoyable and downright simple.

And perhaps just as importantly, I learned that you can define love and life on your own terms. Our families and friends came together to bring us together. And in the end, that inspiration is what we’re trying to honor by making this step together.

Among the many things that were said, some of the words that a dear friend shared struck me as the best lesson I learned in getting married. And like I said, it could seem simple, even obvious, when you read it on a screen, because it’s so universal. But when you live it and make a public commitment to it, it becomes downright profound.

What he told is that, in the end, only love matters. Success and fame and wealth and even health all fade in time, and in the end all you have is love. And love is what matters. I hope everyone in the world gets the chance to discover that in the way that I have. I love you, Tutu.

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